MISSIONS   6-23-2019
Written and Edited by MarkEAW

[ GOTO THE MAIN EAWHS PAGE ]

CONTENTS

INTRO

SINGLE MISSIONS
Making Single Missions | Packing and Unpack Missions | Loading New Missions
.MSN Technical Info | Single Missions Available? | .MSN and CTD

QUICK START MISSIONS
Default Quick Start Parameters | Quick Start Single Mission Parameters | MISNxy.DAT Technical Info
MISNxy.DAT Files and Multiplayer Issue

CAREER
Medals & Promotions | Autosaved Careers | Suspending Career Time | Career Saved Files
Career and MISNxy.DAT Files

-+-

CODEGROUP VERSION CONTENTS

CODEGROUP INTRO

SINGLE MISSIONS

QUICK START MISSIONS


INTRO:

This help document is to inform you a little about the different types of Missions available to you, including a bit of information on saved mission files, in the various forms that EAW saves them.


SINGLE MISSIONS

This section is suppose to be about single missions as much as possible.

In Single Mission mode the player first selects a Side to pilot on and Aircraft shown on the board which will take him to the Mission Parameter Screen. Here he can change all the shown parameters and select Loadout (weapon arrangement) for the mission. After hitting FLY the game will start. It should be noted that in the Mission Parameter Screen there are LOAD and SAVE options for the Mission Data. The LOAD option allows loading of ANY mission saved and can change Mission Parameters for ANY plane on the fly.

 

Making Single Missions:
When you alter the settings on the Single Player Parameters Screen, you set a new default mission that QUICK START will also use making it possible to package a series of Single Missions as a campaign that could be imported and flown my another person.

When you open the Single Mission 'Set Parameters Screen' you get the parameters for the current mission. Configured them to your liking...

You can change the title of the mission name (not filename), just like you can change your pilot name at the start of a Campaign; Move the mouse pointer to the mission name and left click. Now you can Backspace and delete each letter that makes up the name. Type in whatever you want (as long as fits into the allocated space). Then hit the Enter key on your keyboard.

One thing to consider when title naming the missions for a campaign composed of Single Missions is that the saved missions are aircraft specific. (the title mission name by default it will have something like Me109K vs. P-51D). If you save a mission for the Me109K, you can't substitute an FW190 when you're on the 'Set Parameters Screen'. You would have had to select the FW190 when making the mission or a crash to desktop can occur when a different planes is selected. The best thing to do would probably be to give each Single Mission in the campaign a mission title that includes which aircraft it is designed for. Starting if off with a number representing the mission play order should be loaded in relation to the other missions (01,02, etc.!):

Here all the "01" missions would be the same mission, but with you flying different aircraft
ex.s
01-109G-Freie Jagd
01-109K-Freie Jagd
01-190A-Freie Jagd.....

02-109G-Schlacht
02-109K-Schlacht.....

alternative: the entire campaign is arranged by individual aircraft groupings. ex.s
01-109G-Freie Jagd
02-109G-Schlacht
03-109G-Panzerjaeger......

01-190A-Freie Jagd
02-190A-Schlacht......


Now you'll want to save each mission you create. You'll see that there are four options across the bottom of the screen: Load, Save, OK, and Cancel. Since you finished making your new mission, you can save it by clicking on "Save". A dialog box appears, and the new mission will be saved. (All saved Single Missions are stored in the "\Savedata" sub folder in your EAW main game Folder. The Single Missions will be named FS000000.msn, FS000001.msn, FS000002.msn, etc..)

 

Packing and Unpacking Missions:
As far as the actual archiving them goes, all you have to do is go to your "\Savedata" folder and place the specific FS0000XX.msn files into a single zip archive. You would then send the archive to whomever wants it. That person would then simply unzip the archive or and place the mission files directly into his "\Savedata" folder. He would need to remove and/or backup any files he previously has in his "\Savedata" sub folder which have the same filenames (FS0000XX.msn) as the packaged "Single Mission Campaign Files" to avoid overwriting his own saved missions he may want to keep. (The files are kept in numerical order in the \Savedata folder).

 

Loading New Missions:
When you want to load a saved mission, goto the the Single Mission 'Set Parameters Screen', you can then click on "Load" at the bottom of the page and a selection box appears in which you can see the Single Missions that are stored in the \Savedata sub folder, they are sorted by Mission Titles (not by filename); They will be displayed in the "Set Parameters Screen Load Box" by the mission title name that it was saved with, not the number of the filename. If there are too many to display, you will have to scroll down a bit to see all of them. If you click on one of them, then click on OK, that mission file will be loaded for you with all the parameters pre set, just like it was saved.

 

.MSN Technical Info:
When custom theatres are made, the previous set of present .MSN files can cause problems and those need to be replaced with the modded theater supplied .MSN files (If they came with any). The previous MSN files often contain values which are configured improperly for the new custom theatre. So be aware that most of the time the old \Savedata folder can contain mission data from another game scenario with data that couldn't be properly used in a new custom theater or campaign. Therefore these add-ons crashed immediately.

Note: There are instances when it will happen when a .MSN file might luckily (not by design) contain "matching" data which would work with certain plane selections, Ex: the entries were correct and the game could set an appropriate mission with it. These configured .MSN would keep working for that plane, but only until another addon would replace it requiring new .MSN data.

You can use Gurney's Single Mission Editor tool to convert these files to text. See my -Community Addons And Files Help Document-.
 

 

This list below are the changeable settings stored in the ".MSN" files for EAWv1.2:



ULONG CRC;
ULONG VerNum;
ULONG Status;
char Description[_MAX_PATH];

// things to be modified by single mission parameter pages

long YearNum; // * Time Period: 1940 = 0, 1943 = 1, 1944 = 2, 1945 = 3
long TimeNum; // * Time of Day: Random = 0, Dawn = 1, Day = 2, Dusk = 3, Night = 4
long Weather; // * Weahter: Random = 0, Clear = 1, PartlyCloudy = 2, HeavyCloud = 3, Overcast = 4

// Primary Mission
long MissionType; // Mission: Mission Type
long TargetAreaOffset; // Target: Target location offset in worlddata.

long AircraftNo; // * Number of Aircraft: Random = 0, 1 - 12
long AltitudeBand; // * Cruise Altitude: Random = 0, Low = 1, Medium = 2, High = 3
long AttackHomeBase; // Home Base: Home Base area location offset in worlddata

// Friendly Support Activity
long SecondaryType; // * Secondary Aircraft: None = -2, Random = -1, AircraftType 0 - (MAX_PLANE_TYPES-1)
long SecondarySize; // * Formation Size: Random = 0, Small = 1, Medium = 2, Large = 3
long PilotSkill; // * Pilot Skill Level: Random = 0, Green = 1, Seasoned = 2, Expert = 3

// Expected Enemy Activity
long EnemyActivity; // * Air Activity Level: Random = 0, Light = 1, Moderate = 2, Heavy = 3
long EnemyMainType; // * Primary Aircraft: None = -2, Random = -1, AircraftType 0 - (MAX_PLANE_TYPES-1)
long EnemySecType; // * Secondary Aircraft: None = -2, Random = -1, AircraftType 0 - (MAX_PLANE_TYPES-1)
long EnemySkill; // * Pilot Skill Level: Random = 0, Green = 1, Seasoned = 2, Expert = 3
long EnemyAAA; // * AAA Activity Level: Random = 0, Light = 1, Moderate = 2, Heavy = 3

 

One source indicates that a number of the values in the "things to be set elsewhere... " section below were present but never referenced or used in routines in the source code for v1.2. However when Weather is set in the Mission Parameter screen the game changes the Overcast setting and selects from two altitude bands. Similarly all the other parameters are chosen by the computer AFTER the mission parameter selection is finished.

// things to be set elsewhere...these aren't choices for the user and are therefore not visible on the Mission Parameter screen.

long MissionWeather; // weather flag
ULONG MissionDate; // Game Date/Time

long TargetOffset; // actual target offset in world database.

long AttackNumMain; // 2-16
long AttackNumSec; // 2-16
long AttackTypeMain; // Main defending plane type.
long AttackTypeSec; // Secondary defending plane type, None = -2, Random = -1
long AttackPilotSkill; // Attacking pilot skill level 0, 1, 2
long AttackMainAlt; // altitude in FEET
long AttackSecAlt; // altitude in FEET

long DefActivity; // 0, 1, 2
long DefTypeMain; // Main defending plane type
long DefTypeSec; // Secondary defending plane type,
long DefPilotSkill; // Attacking pilot skill level 0, 1, 2
long DefMainAlt; // altitude in FEET
long DefSecAlt; // altitude in FEET

 

 

SINGLE MISSION FILE (TEXT VERSION)

CRC32: 20938210
Version Number: -1442839963
Instant Action: 0
Description: zg52-2
Year: 0 ; 1940
Time of Day: 0 ; Random
Weather: 0 ; Random
Mission Type: 0 ; Escort
Target Number: 0
Number of Aircraft: 0
Altitude: 0 ; Random
Home Base: 0
Secondary Aircraft Type: 0

 

 

The complete list of .MSN file variables, this is all it's writing:

input.c(707): fprintf(fp, "CRC: %d\n\t",sm_data.CRC);
input.c(708): fprintf(fp, "VerNum: %d\n\t",sm_data.VerNum);
input.c(709): fprintf(fp, "Status: %d\n\t",sm_data.Status);
input.c(710): fprintf(fp, "Description: %s\n\t",sm_data.Description);

input.c(711): fprintf(fp, "YearNum: %d\n\t",sm_data.YearNum);
input.c(712): fprintf(fp, "TimeNum: %d\n\t",sm_data.TimeNum);
input.c(713): fprintf(fp, "Weather: %d\n\t",sm_data.Weather);

input.c(714): fprintf(fp, "MissionType: %d\n\t",sm_data.MissionType);
input.c(715): fprintf(fp, "TargetAreaOffset: %d\n\t",sm_data.TargetAreaOffset);
input.c(716): fprintf(fp, "AircraftNo: %d\n\t",sm_data.AircraftNo);
input.c(717): fprintf(fp, "AltitudeBand: %d\n\t",sm_data.AltitudeBand);
input.c(718): fprintf(fp, "AttackHomeBase: %d\n\t",sm_data.AttackHomeBase);
input.c(719): fprintf(fp, "SecondaryType: %d\n\t",sm_data.SecondaryType);
input.c(720): fprintf(fp, "SecondarySize: %d\n\t",sm_data.SecondarySize);
input.c(721): fprintf(fp, "PilotSkill: %d\n\t",sm_data.PilotSkill);
input.c(722): fprintf(fp, "EnemyActivity: %d\n\t",sm_data.EnemyActivity);
input.c(723): fprintf(fp, "EnemyMainType: %d\n\t",sm_data.EnemyMainType);
input.c(724): fprintf(fp, "EnemySecType: %d\n\t",sm_data.EnemySecType);
input.c(725): fprintf(fp, "EnemySkill: %d\n\t",sm_data.EnemySkill);
input.c(726): fprintf(fp, "EnemyAAA: %d\n\t",sm_data.EnemyAAA);
input.c(727): fprintf(fp, "MissionWeather: %d\n\t",sm_data.MissionWeather);
input.c(728): fprintf(fp, "MissionDate: %d\n\t",sm_data.MissionDate);
input.c(729): fprintf(fp, "TargetOffset: %d\n\t",sm_data.TargetOffset);

input.c(730): fprintf(fp, "AttackNumMain: %d\n\t",sm_data.AttackNumMain);
input.c(731): fprintf(fp, "AttackNumSec: %d\n\t",sm_data.AttackNumSec);
input.c(732): fprintf(fp, "AttackPilotSkill: %d\n\t",sm_data.AttackPilotSkill);
input.c(733): fprintf(fp, "AttackMainAlt: %d\n\t",sm_data.AttackMainAlt);
input.c(734): fprintf(fp, "AttackSecAlt: %d\n\t",sm_data.AttackSecAlt);
input.c(735): fprintf(fp, "DefActivity: %d\n\t",sm_data.DefActivity);
input.c(736): fprintf(fp, "DefTypeMain: %d\n\t",sm_data.DefTypeMain);
input.c(737): fprintf(fp, "DefTypeSec: %d\n\t",sm_data.DefTypeSec);
input.c(738): fprintf(fp, "DefPilotSkill: %d\n\t",sm_data.DefPilotSkill);
input.c(739): fprintf(fp, "DefMainAlt: %d\n\t",sm_data.DefMainAlt);
input.c(740): fprintf(fp, "DefSecAlt: %d\n\n",sm_data.DefSecAlt);

 

Looking a bit deeper into AttackSecAlt and DefSecAlt, which is obviously about attacker/defender planes altitude. The game code shows that the defenders duplicate this altitude from the attackers, hence they'll be at the same cruise level. This also means that whatever is written into the .MSN file will be overwritten by the game.

The way the game works is the enemy will start with the altitude band +/- an offset value (what's the value? set or random?) and they're not always level with the attacker, since the attacker may change his altitude anytime, it takes a while before the other side does too and in some situations may not even have time to get to the same level, i.e. when they spawn in very close range.

It may be fun to have big altitude differences in the game, that is if you don't mind loosing more often than not. Such things did happen in real life, but I don't think players will like that in an online game... Still the player (attacker) can always climb/start as high as possible resulting in an energy advantage at all times over the defending aircraft, which will make the low flying enemy planes an easy target.

 

Single Missions Available?
It appears that Year and Side you pick determines the types of missions available to choose from.

 

.MSN and CTD:
The .MSN file is only written to in offline games, but always after exiting a flight mission back to the Menus Screen, possibly from the Single Player Parameters screen and exiting back to the Menus Screens. Sometimes a Crash To Desktop (CTD) would occur and not let the game finish writing to an .MSN file causing the file to become corrupt and truly unusable.

This can cause players in online games to spawn hundred of miles away from the target area and being assigned different airbase and target values than the other players who hadn't suffered a CTD. It can also cause other offline issues as well...


 


QUICK START MISSIONS

This section is suppose to be about Quick Start Missions as much as possible.

Quick Start Missions are very easy, you select this option and you are immediately thrown into the fight, if your ready or not.

 

Default Quick Start Parameters:
Quick start missions are pre set within the game.exe primarily. They start you off in a partially randomized instant combat situation that is sourced from the DATA.CDF, and within it a MISNxy.DAT File, depending on the year of operation. A Modified Quick Start Mission uses the settings from the last flown Single Mission game data (found in a .MSN file) and keeps them until changes are made in Single Mission mode again. The default stock mission is set in the year ???? and puts you in a ???? plane, that instantly puts you on the tails of B-17 bombers.... This essentially gives you the first fun factor instantly.

HINT: To restore the original default Quick Start Mission (Single missions as well); You erase the *******.MSN files in the \Savedata folder and the game will reassign new default mission parameters from presets, (this applies to the stock v1.2 ETO target set and not a modded theater of operation/campaign since they are suppose to have their own targetsets and frontlines).

 

Quick Start Single Mission Parameters:
Once you start changing the Single Mission 'Parameter Screen' settings , your effectively manipulating the QUICK START Mission as well.

You'll find that the Quick Start can have very wide range of playable options since certain selections in the Single Mission 'Parameter Screen' can have the value of 'random' set. This is entered into a .MSN File that tells the game during  Single Player Missions and Quick Start missions to randomize those selections. If you set Weather or Time of Day as 'random' then these will also be randomized in Quick Mission. The other choices in the Single Missions 'Parameter Screen' remains the same for each subsequent Quick Mission game, until the Single Mission Parameter Screen is changed again.

 

 

MISNxy.DAT Technical Info:
The "MISN40.dat", "MISN43.dat", "MISN44.dat" and "MISN45.dat" files located in the DATA.CDF are used by Quick Start mainly to to generate AI planes based on probability and randomization when applicable. Such as to select friendly and enemy forces for “Random” slots in Single Missions. They have no effect on user-selected forces for Single Missions, availability of which is governed by mission type, aircraft class (fighter or bomber) and year (year of entry into service, compared with year of mission).

The first “block” appears to be for fighters, either friendlies or enemy. Enemies in this block will fly escorts and oppose you on sweeps and interdictions; friendlies may appear as supports or if you yell for help. Availability does not appear to depend on year: you can get Me262s in 1940 if you want. Bomber types placed in this block appear to be ignored.

The probability of appearance seems always to be (in hex) 20, 40, 80 or FF, corresponding to decimal values 32, 64, 128 and 255. The probabilities appear to be relative: that is, if there are two aircraft with the same value, they have an equal chance of appearing. A probability of “ff” therefore does not mean that this aircraft will always appear!

The third block appears to be for bomber types which can be escorted or intercepted. On escort missions, nationality is relevant: for example, RAF fighters will not escort USAAF bombers, but if you change the B17 into a British aeroplane (using Jeroen van Soest’s Editor program), the RAF will happily escort it. Fighter types placed in here appear to be ignored (for both interception and escort) even if they are in the “attack plane” category.

Note that using Jeroen van Soest's Aircraft Edit tool, an aircraft can be made to serve both as a fighter and a bomber. See my -Community Addons And Files Help Document-.

At this stage I (Prune) do not know the function of the second block. It is not obviously related to multiple formations, because if several flights of bombers appear, they are always drawn from types listed in the third block. They might be planes that you can come across on a sweep; but I haven’t much experience of that type of mission.

 

MISSION FILES FORMAT (MISNxx.DAT)
There are Mission files: MISN40.DAT MISN43.DAT MISN44.DAT MISN45.DAT
Presumably these affect the aircraft available in missions in the various years.
Each file is 60 d bytes long, divided into 3 equal chunks of 20 d bytes.

MISN40.DAT
0400 0000 [090a 1013 0000 0000] ff80 ff40 0000 0000
04=4 flyable aircraft.

Types=Hurri(09),Spit 1(0a), 109E(10), 110C(13)
ff etc= probability (?) of appearance
0500 0000 [091c 1319 1b00 0000] ffff 2080 4000 0000
05= 5 aircraft
Types=Hurri, He111, 110C, Ju88A, Ju87
ff etc=probability as bomber(?)

0200 0000 [1c19 0000 0000 0000] ff80 0000 0000 0000
02=2 aircraft
Types=He111, Ju88A
ff=probability as bomber (?)

MISN43.DAT
0800 0000 [0200 obod 1116 141a] c440 ff40 ffc4 4020
08=8 flyable aircraft.
Types = P47C, P38H, Spit9, Typh, 109G,
190A, Ju88C
ff etc= probability (?) of appearance

0800 0000 [0206 080d 0f16 141a] ff80 ff40 ff80 8040
08= 8 aircraft
Types= P47C, B17, B26, Typh, Mosq,
190A, 110G, Ju88C
ff etc=probability as bomber(?)
0600 0000 [0607 080f 1a15 0000] ff20 8080 ff40 0000
06=6 aircraft
Types= B17, B24, B26, Mosq, Ju88C, Me410
ff=probability as bomber (?)

MISN44.DAT
0800 0000 [0204 o10b 0d16 1115] ff80 40ff 80ff ff20
0
08=8 flyable aircraft.
Types = P47C, P51B, P38J, Spit9, Typh
190A, 109G, Me410
ff etc= probability (?) of appearance
0800 0000 [0204 0608 0d0f 1615] ff80 80ff ff80 ff40
08= 8 aircraft
Types= P47C, P51B, B17, B26, Typh,
Mosq, 190A, Me410
ff etc=probability as bomber(?)

0600 0000 [0607 080f 1a15 0000] ff80 8080 ff40 0000
06=6 aircraft
Types= B17, B24, B26, Mosq, Ju88C, Me410
ff=probability as bomber (?)

MISN45.DAT
0800 0000 [0503 0c0d 0e17 1218] ffff ff80 80ff ff20
0800 0000 [0305 0608 0d0f 1615] ff80 80ff ff80 ff40
0600 0000 [0607 080f 1a15 0000] ffff 8080 ff40 0000
08=8 flyable aircraft.
Types = P51D, P47D, Spit14, Typh
Temp, 190D, 109K, Me262
ff etc= probability (?) of appearance
08= 8 aircraft
Types= P47D, P51D, B17, B26, Typh,
Mosq, 190A, Me410
ff etc=probability as bomber(?)
06=6 aircraft
Types= B17, B24, B26, Mosq, Ju88C,
Me410 ff=probability as bomber (?)

 

 

MISNxy.DAT Files and Multiplayer Issue:
The MSNxy.dat files (found in DATA.CDF) contain probabilities of certain AI planes appearing. The AIs are selected by the entries in the "misnxx.dat" files. The default values in these files give different planes different probabilities of appearing. They caused a problem in multiplayer, because they often generated different AIs on different players' PCs. Since the AIs are set by each player's computer/game (rather than passed from the Host), so in an Intercept Mission, different players may be intercepting a different type of bomber, with different escorts.

EX: One player could be shooting down an AI plane seen as a P47C and on another computer it would be a P38H. Also another example is if the mission is an Intercept of allied planes one axis pilot might see B17s escorted by P47Cs and another might see B24s escorted by P38Hs.

The probability needs to be transferred / passed from Host to all players, rather than each computer generating there own to fix this problem. Mod tool authors back when a frontend known as OAW was designed, made is so the files were edited by the OAW selector and gave certain aircraft a 100% chance of appearing which guaranteed that all players saw the same AIs.

With the OAWV200 they had built in a simple way of generating four new "misnxx.dat" files, which only have one allied fighter, one allied bomber, one axis fighter, and one axis bomber. Then a code is generated, part of what is called the new "magic number" system; A player can select the four aircraft, generate the magic number, and post it in chat before the game is run. Others would then copy it and with one click of a button in the fronted, OAW will generate the same four files in their EAW directories. That way when the game is run, all players get the same four "misnxx.dat" files, so all players see the same AIs.

That method became redundant in the CodeGroups EAWv1.28 when in that version they where able to set the friendly and enemy primary and secondary aircraft and bases from within the games newly expanded Host Parameter Screen...

 


CAREER

This section is suppose to be about Career and Campaign Missions as much as possible.

In Career mode, the player first selects a year and side to pilot on for the Career he's going to play. After hitting START CAREER he'll be taken to the Career Parameter Screen where he can select his plane type and crew. Plane type is self evident but the available pilots have different skill levels which will impact the flown missions. Their skill / morale will improve or diminish based on the outcome for each mission. Alterations can be made during the Career but plane types will be assigned depending on availability and / or relocation to various airbases.

Flying a successful Career stands and falls with the losses encountered in the missions, as limited aircraft availability will gradually wear your squad strength down until all pilots are dead and no replacements are available, which is end of game. As for Loadout, the game depends on preprogrammed data for stockpiles and replenishment dates, so the player must carefully determine their use.

 

Medals & Promotions:
It should be noted that you won't be able to obtain any medals or promotions unless the "Unlimited Ammunition" and "Invulnerability" features from the Difficulty menu are turned off.

 

Auto Saved Careers:
The game saves a career file automatically after a mission. EX: If you begin a career and play, say 3 missions immediately. You then exit the game, turn off the computer, and do something else. The next time you start EAW again. If you select that career, you will begin with the fourth mission of that career. The career saved files have names like career00.sve, career01.sve, etc..

 

Suspending Career Time:
It IS possible to save a career at different points and continually re-fly the career from that point. All career information is stored in the "\Savedata" sub folder inside your "European Air War" main game folder. The careers will have names like "career00.sve", "career01.sve", etc. Once you know which career is which, you can simply copy that career into another folder. This "suspends time" for that career-------if you were to fly further missions, you could revert back to an earlier time in your career by copying your "suspended" version back into the "\Savedata" folder. Of course, that would erase your "current" time in the career, unless you saved that one too.

Example: I am flying a career named "career00.sve". I am currently at 14 June 1943. I create a folder called "\MyCareers", and create sub-folders for each of the time periods that I want to save. I copy "career00.sve" to one of my sub sub-folders, and name a new folder something like "14-June-43". I go back and play EAW. My next mission starts on 28 June 1943. After it's over, I copy "career00.sve" into a new sub sub-folder in "\MyCareers", and then name the folder ""\28-June-43". I play EAW again. The next mission starts on 12 July 1943. I copy "career00.sve" into one of those folders again, and rename the folder "\12-July-43".

Now I have a folder called "\MyCareers". In it I have stored files for my "career00.sve" from 3 different dates (sub folders are named by date). If I were to play EAW again, my career would most likely start on 24 July 1943. But if I copy the "career00.sve" file from the sub sub-folder titled "\MyCareers\14-June-43", back into the "\Savedata sub-folder,then play EAW, my mission would be flown on 14 June 1943, with the same number of victories, missions, squadron mates, etc.--------so in effect, I'm going back in time!

 

 

Career Saved Files:
structure is complex.
When you exit a career the "careerXX.sve" file is created. The "careerXX.sve" file contains a "Targets.dat", "Airfield.dat" and "Tardata.dat" file containing damage data, followed by the pilot's career data.
You will get a CTD if something goes wrong when this large file is being written and verified...

 

Career and MISNxy.DAT Files:
I don't think any MISNxx.DAT files are used in Campaigns??? please advise!

 

 

 



CODEGROUP VERSION CONTENT



CODEGROUP INTRO

This help document is to inform you about the new Mission features associated with the CodeGroups Mission selection.


SINGLE MISSIONS

This section is suppose to be about the new single missions as much as possible.

 

 

.MSN Technical Info:
The new MSN file system we use in 160 special is based on the 1.2 version with changes.
The bytes relating to mission data are exactly in the same places as they were in the 1.2 version.
The file has been extended, so the short description which was early in the old file is no longer used.
The version and CRC check is disabled in the exes that use these files.

The extended part has:
The theatre at byte 401 (counting from 1 and not zero)
The planeset at bye 465
A description starting at byte 529 including the year, mission type, target, base and aircraft involved.
Multiplayer friendly secondary, enemy primary and enemy secondary bases at bytes 721 to 726
The whole file is 800 bytes as opposed to the 1.2 version which is 400 bytes.

Several data items which were there, but unused in the 1.2 version, have been made use of in the 160Special exes.
These exes read the loaded MSN file and start a single mission almost instantly. The only screens used are the pilot map screen and the debriefing screen at the end of the mission.

 

 

A number of the values in the "things to be set elsewhere... " section below were present but never referenced or used in routines in the source code for v1.2.

In the 1.28 development I changed two of them to become the interdiction type and the interdiction size. I also disabled the CRC check to make editing easier.
Later I made the 150 and 160 special exes use the four altitude values, but these only come into play if a "*.msn" file is loaded with the 160 mission editor program first. They can add a bit of fun by setting up a "bounce" situation with the friendly altitude much higher than the enemy, or vice versa.

 

This is a list of the changeable settings stored in the ".MSN" files...

 

// things to be modified by single mission parameter pages

long YearNum; // * Time Period: 1940 = 0, 1943 = 1, 1944 = 2, 1945 = 3
long TimeNum; // * Time of Day: Random = 0, Dawn = 1, Day = 2, Dusk = 3, Night = 4
long Weather; // * Weahter: Random = 0, Clear = 1, PartlyCloudy = 2, HeavyCloud = 3, Overcast = 4

// Primary Mission
long MissionType; // Mission: Mission Type
long TargetAreaOffset; // Target: Target location offset in worlddata.

long AircraftNo; // * Number of Aircraft: Random = 0, 1 - 12
long AltitudeBand; // * Cruise Altitude: Random = 0, Low = 1, Medium = 2, High = 3
long AttackHomeBase; // Home Base: Home Base area location offset in worlddata

// Friendly Support Activity
long SecondaryType; // * Secondary Aircraft: None = -2, Random = -1, AircraftType 0 - (MAX_PLANE_TYPES-1)
long SecondarySize; // * Formation Size: Random = 0, Small = 1, Medium = 2, Large = 3
long PilotSkill; // * Pilot Skill Level: Random = 0, Green = 1, Seasoned = 2, Expert = 3

// Expected Enemy Activity
long EnemyActivity; // * Air Activity Level: Random = 0, Light = 1, Moderate = 2, Heavy = 3
long EnemyMainType; // * Primary Aircraft: None = -2, Random = -1, AircraftType 0 - (MAX_PLANE_TYPES-1)
long EnemySecType; // * Secondary Aircraft: None = -2, Random = -1, AircraftType 0 - (MAX_PLANE_TYPES-1)
long EnemySkill; // * Pilot Skill Level: Random = 0, Green = 1, Seasoned = 2, Expert = 3
long EnemyAAA; // * AAA Activity Level: Random = 0, Light = 1, Moderate = 2, Heavy = 3

 

 

A number of things cannot be set from single mission parameters, but I have been able to set some in my MSN file editor. It creates custom MSN files for a special version of 160.
This version has no selection screens because all of the selections have been made by the editor.

// things to be set elsewhere...

long MissionWeather; // weather flag
ULONG MissionDate; // Game Date/Time

long TargetOffset; // actual target offset in world database.

long AttackNumMain; // 2-16
long AttackNumSec; // 2-16
long AttackTypeMain; // Main defending plane type.
long AttackTypeSec; // Secondary defending plane type, None = -2, Random = -1
long AttackPilotSkill; // Attacking pilot skill level 0, 1, 2
long AttackMainAlt; // altitude in FEET
long AttackSecAlt; // altitude in FEET

long IntType; // 0, 1, 2, 3, 4
long IntSize; // Main defending plane type
long DefTypeSec; // Secondary defending plane type,
long DefPilotSkill; // Attacking pilot skill level 0, 1, 2
long DefMainAlt; // altitude in FEET
long DefSecAlt; // altitude in FEET

 


QUICK START MISSIONS

This section is suppose to be about Quick Start Missions as much as possible.

Quick Start Missions are very easy, you select this option and you are immediately thrown into the fight, if your ready or not.

 

 

 

 

 

 

[END]